Phone or text (513) 703-7206
steve@bedrockinspections.com

Home inspector

Buying a piece of property is the easiest part of owning real estate. The real challenge is keeping maintenance and energy cost to a minimum. With my real estate experience and training I can help you make an informed decision on your purchase.

I grew up in a family construction business. After graduating from the University of Cincinnati, I started buying, rehabbing and selling property. Looking to do something different in 1998 I started inspecting property and formed Bedrock Enterprises, Inc.  The property inspection business was a good match to my background and interests. I am a certified ASHI Inspector and Instructor. I continue to sharpen my inspection skills with education courses offered by Scarlet Oaks and the American Society of Home Inspectors.  .

Bedrock Home Inspection
Phone or text (513) 703-7206
Steve@bedrockinspections.com

Over the last 20 years I have inspected a wide variety of real estate. I have inspected Homearama upscale homes to foreclosed properties. I have inspected multi-unit apartment buildings up to 35 units. I have inspected different types of commercial properties including banks, florist, bars, laundry mats etc. 

My inspection service offers the latest equipment and technology available:


  1. Digital Photography
  2. Computer-generated reports
  3. Specialized home inspection software
  4. Reports emailed in 24 hours or less
  5. Available nights and weekends
  6. Basic energy savings tips


The buyer, parents, siblings, friends etc.. are recommended to attend all or part of the inspection.

Self Directed IRA
IRS rules allow you to use IRA money to buy real estate or just about anything else.

Guidant Financial Group
www.guidantfinancial.com (888) 472-4455

Equity Trust Company
www.trustetc.com  (888) 382-4727

Appealing Property Tax Valuation

www.hamiltoncountyauditor.org
24 hour hotline (513) 946-4663

Termites
In this Area of the country it is very common for homes to have termites.  Many lending institutions require a State of Ohio termite report for purchasing real estate.  www.agri/ohio.gov (614)-728-6201


Radon
Radon is a gas that is hazardous to inhale. About 12% of lung cancer cases and more than 20,000 Americans die of radon related lung cancer each year.  You cannot see, smell or taste radon. Testing is the only way to find out your homes radon level. www.epa.gov/radon 1-800-767-7236  








Septic Systems
When purchasing a home with a septic system, it is important for the potential homeowner to understand how their new septic system works and determine if there are any deficiencies with the system.  Septic systems are a vital component to the homes they serve, helping protect the environment and public health.  When these systems malfunction, they can create problems not only for the property owner, but also for the community as a whole. Many counties have inspection programs that educated homeowners about the care and maintenance needs of their septic system. We recommend you contact your local county health department.



Childrens Health Protection

www.Yosemite.epa.gov
Children may be more vulnerable to environmental exposures than adults because:

Their bodily systems are still developing
They eat more, drink more, and breathe more in proportion to their body size
Their behavior can expose them more to chemicals and organisms 


Asbestos
Most products today do not contain asbestos. You cannot tell if a material contains asbestos unless you test it.  However until the 1970’s, many types of building products and insulation material used in the homes contained asbestos. (Ex. steam pipes, boilers, furnace ducts, floor tiles, insulation, roofing shingles and sidings etc.) If you think asbestos is in your home, don’t panic! The best thing to do is to leave asbestos material that is in good condition alone.  Generally, material in good condition will not release asbestos fibers.  There is no danger unless fibers are release and inhaled in the lungs.  www.epa/gov/asbestos  (202) 554-1404 


Lead-Based Paint
Lead-based paints were used in many homes prior to its banning by the federal government in 1978.  Many documented cases of lead poisoning can be attributed to lead contamination resulting from the degradation of such paints. Lead-based paints in good condition pose little risk but those that begin to peel, chip, chalk, or crack do pose a health risk. As lead-based paint products degrade lead can be released into the surrounding environment in the form of dust. Lead dust can also be formed and become airborne when lead-based paint is sanded or scrapped. Painted surfaces when rubbed together can also produce lead dust. The lead dust can settle and then become airborne again when disturbed by sweeping, vacuuming, or just walking through a contaminated area. Chips of paint flaking off of exterior surfaces can even cause ground contamination. Lead poisoning can occur when lead is ingested if inhaled and the concentration of lead in the body will grow over time with continued exposure. Physical symptoms of lead poisoning in children can include: damage to the brain and nervous system, behavior and learning problems, slowed physical development, hearing problems, and chronic headaches. Adults are also affected and can have: difficulties during pregnancy, reproductive problems, high blood pressure, digestive problems, nerve disorders, memory and concentration problems, and joint pain. http://www.epa.gov/lead/ 1-800-424-5323

Mold
The first thing to understand about mold is there is a little bit of mold everywhere. Mold spores can enter the home on animals, clothing, shoes, bags and people.  Excessive moisture in your home can make mold grow. Common sites include humidifiers, leaky roof and pipes, under sinks, bathtubs, plants, steam from cooking, wet cloths etc. If a mold problem is suspected have a mold inspection done by a specialist in this field. www.epa.gov/mold   1-800-638-2772

Urea Formaldehyde Foam Insulation
Urea Formaldehyde foam is thermosetting.  They are formed from syrup that foams when mixed with an appropriate reactant, Formaldehyde in this case, gets warm and cures in place. UF foam can be produced in various densities depending on the chemical mix. The reaction produces water that must evaporate from the mass.  To make the reaction go to completion there must be extra formaldehyde solution that must also evaporate.  If there is too much extra formaldehyde in the mix it may take an appreciable time to disperse. As UF foam ages, particularly if the temperature is high, the foam breaks down releases formaldehyde.  As a finished product, the foam is fire resistant.  It does not rot or support fungus growth.  It is an excellent acoustical insulation as well as thermal.  Carefully installed it fills cavities completely, making it way around wires and even into electrical boxes.UF foam does not have good adhesion to wood or plaster.  Inside it shrinks a trifle and pulls away from the walls.  The shrinkage is not enough to affect the R-value seriously.  More serious are the voids left from inexpert filling.Because a few individuals are especially sensitive to formaldehyde, a most reactive chemical, in 1983 the Federal Government declared UF to be hazardous, but a few years later reversed itself, more a matter of judicial fiat and political posturing than scientific deliberation.You can recognize UF foam by its light color, soft friable foamy substance and its habit of squeezing out of openings as if it were soap lather.  Tri-polymer foam, a similar looking material is not made of formaldehyde.  www.epa/gov/urea 1-800-638-2772

Steve Otten, ACI

ASHI Certified Inspector
#202649

Day-Evening-Weekend Appointments available

BEDROCK
HOME INSPECTION